More Biosecurity Bollocks…

MAFBNZ are discontinuing to fund the national Dutch Elm Disease programme.  They are instead side-shifting it to local authorities as it doesn’t fit into the ‘evaluated 20 worst pests’.

Apparently MAFBNZ approached chief executives an mayors of all 86 territorial authorites and said if you give us some money we may be able to help.  If you give us less that $100k then the programme would be quickly transitioned out.  If you give us between $100k and $200k we will act as a facilitator for a limited time to enable councils to maintin the porgramme, but would not provide further finances. If you give greater than $200k per annum of the next 10 year MAFBNZ would assist by coordinating delivery of the programme and contribute 1/3 of the costs.

How very big of them; NOT.

Now I don’t know much about DED but the whole shabang opens up a snakes nest and leads to some serious questions that need to be answered

  1. What are the 20 worst pests? I couldn’t find any info on the Biosecurity website
  2. Why have an arbitary round number determining what you respond to and what you don’t? 
  3. Is pest number 21 THAT much better than 20?
  4. What if some territorial authorities don’t control a pest; will the pest respect the territorial boundaries?
  5. Why is the culture in BNZ such that they will only do their job on ‘non-worst’ pests if others contribute?
  6. On that note why, when we asked why ‘we’ weren’t consulted on a discussion document a while ago, were we told that they were only inviting industries that are prepared to contribute cash to joint ventures around biosecurity. There’s a whole rats’ nest in that statement.

I did submit on the aforementioned discussion document and ended it by saying

We “feel the modus operandi of ‘to have a say, first you must pay, is abhorrent and detrimental to all industries involved.  This formula is divisive and extortionate, and does little to foster the collaborative approach to Biosecurity that this document wishes to attain.”

The DED programme is just another example of the user pays culture that exists in BNZ.  Rather than protect NZ BNZ are putting our economy at huge risk.

 

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